Who was the primary reformer of the Protestant Reformation?

What did Protestant Reformers?

The Protestant Reformation was a major 16th century European movement aimed initially at reforming the beliefs and practices of The Roman Catholic Church. Its religious aspects were supplemented by ambitious political rulers who wanted to extend their power and control at the expense of the Church.

Which was a major result of the Reformation?

The Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism, one of the three major branches of Christianity. The Reformation led to the reformulation of certain basic tenets of Christian belief and resulted in the division of Western Christendom between Roman Catholicism and the new Protestant traditions.

Why did the Protestants break from the Catholic Church?

Because of corruption in the Catholic Church, some people saw that the way it worked needed to change. People like Erasmus, Huldrych Zwingli, Martin Luther and John Calvin saw the corruption and tried to stop it. This led to a split in the church, into Catholics and various Protestant churches.

Which situation was a direct result of the Protestant Reformation?

Which situation was a direct result of the Protestant Reformation in western Europe? The Pope was removed as leader of the Catholic Church.

How did the Reformation affect Europe socially?

The Reformation itself was affected by the invention of the Printing Press and the expansion of commerce which characterized the Renaissance. Both Reformations, both Protestant and Catholic affected print culture, education, popular rituals and culture, and the role of women in society.

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What was one of the negative results of the Reformation?

The literature on the consequences of the Reformation shows a variety of short- and long-run effects, including Protestant-Catholic differences in human capital, economic development, competition in media markets, political economy, and anti-Semitism, among others.